A revolution in the sharing of knowledge…

Transforming e-Knowledge
TABLE OF CONTENTS     Best Practices, Business Models, and Strategies   © SCUP 2003
back page  Page 135  next page    

Experiencing Continuous Reinvention (continued)

 

 


Chapter 6

Best Practices, Business Models, and Strategies

book image
Book Purchase

Home
Index
Case Studies
Glossary
Bibliography
Contact us

   

Success in global markets depends on communities sharing knowledge across the globe. . . . Knowledge-driven markets make it imperative to develop a “knowledge strategy” along with a business strategy. Yet many organizations have no explicit, consolidated knowledge strategy. Rather, it exists implicitly at best, dispersed in strategic plans, human resource reports, or system-improvement proposals.
A knowledge strategy details in operational terms how to develop and apply the capabilities required to execute the business strategy. Therefore, a knowledge strategy eventually depends on communities
of practice.”

Wenger et al, 2002

 

Take Advantage of Changes in the Mobility of Networked Knowledge. The pervasive spread of networks through enterprises has changed the mobility and distribution of knowledge. Mohanabir Sawnhey and Deval Parikh (2001) point out that back-office knowledge is often embedded in the network’s shared infrastructure, while the front-office knowledge resides at the network’s periphery, where the users are. Significant units of formerly disconnected or isolated knowledge become available to users wherever they are needed. These developments enable enterprises to consider a combination of four strategies for profiting from knowledge mobility:

  • arbitrage—moving knowledge to locations where maintenance costs are lower;
  • aggregation—combining formerly isolated knowledge into a pool of shared knowledge;
     

Reinvention of Strategies

  • Take immediate action to improve your enterprise’s readiness for e-knowledge (See Chapter 7 for 10 immediate actions).
  • Develop an explicit enterprise knowledge strategy. Develop an explicit enterprise knowledge management strategy to tie knowledge asset management and reinventing knowledge ecology to business plans. (See Chapter 7 for examples)
  • Develop strategies to take advantage of changes in the mobility of networked knowledge:
    • arbitrage—moving knowledge to locations where maintenance costs are lower;
    • aggregation—combining formerly isolated knowledge into a pool of shared knowledge;
    • rewiring—connecting islands of intelligence by creating an information backbone; and
    • reassembly—organizing pieces of knowledge from diverse sources into coherent, customized packages for customers.
  • Prepare to use expeditionary strategies to take advantage of opportunities.
  • Develop a strategy portfolio dealing with productivity improvement, incremental innovation and radical innovation (transformation) (See Chapter 7 for portfolio strategy methodology).
  • Enterprises leverage their relationships with learners, members, customers, and other stakeholders to provide new, personalized versions products, services, and experiences.

 

     

back page   Page 135   next page

|  TOP  |

 

  Smart strategies are always based on a company’s unique knowledge… whether new knowledge, or existing knowledge.

Rene Tissen,
Daniel Andriessen,
Frank Lekanne Deprez