A revolution in the sharing of knowledge…

Transforming e-Knowledge  
TABLE OF CONTENTS     Best Practices, Business Models, and Strategies
© SCUP 2003
   
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Experiencing Continuous Reinvention (continued)

   

Chapter 6

Best Practices, Business Models, and Strategies

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Unbundling Resources and Experiences for Learning and Knowledge Sharing. The act of unbundling resources and experiences enables individuals to shape the nature and source of content, context, and associated tradecraft and the experience in which it is embedded. Unbundling, choice, and personalization are quintessential principles of the e-knowledge culture and the Internet culture on which it is based.

Universities are locked into supply-side thinking; they are out of step with the network economy. Changes in academic culture and university programs will be driven by the demand side (students, alums, employers, marketplace realities),
not from institutional supply-siders (professor, administrators).
The supply-side model sustains the ‘control culture’ of academe when the network economy has embraced a ‘service and value culture.’ The goal should be providing increased value to students and alums, not control.

Martin Irvine, 2001

Changes in Interactivity. e-Knowledge enables reinvention in the patterns and cadences in the interactivity between learners, faculty, mentors, expert practitioners, and supporting staff in instructional development and knowledge management.

For example:

  • e-knowledge resources enable faculty to refashion their role toward knowledge navigator and judgment builder and away from human knowledge repository;
  • e-knowledge encourages the development of resources by teams of faculty, instructional development staff and knowledge management experts;
  • cohort-based learning using e-knowledge resources encourages greater dialogue among and between learners, changing the extent and nature of faculty or mentor involvement;
 

Reinvention of Business Models

  • e-Knowledge enables unbundling of knowledge, learning resources, and experiences.
  • e-Knowledge enables changes in interactivity. It enables reinvention in the patterns and cadences in the interactivity between learners, faculty, mentors, expert practitioners, and supporting staff in instructional development and knowledge management.
  • e-Knowledge drives changes in the economics of knowledge sharing and learning.
    • Sources, types, and combinations of digital knowledge assets will increase exponentially, enabling greater choice and personalization;
    • Unit costs of producing digital assets will decline as enterprises refine routines, policies, protocols, use of auto-tagging tools and agents, and explore alternate sources of e-knowledge;
    • Price of individual units of digital knowledge will decline dramatically in the face of competition (including excellent sources of free e-knowledge), diminishing costs of production;
    • Premium prices will be accepted by individuals for particular combinations of content, context, and tradecraft embedded in performances and experiences;
    • New markets for an individual’s or enterprise’s e-knowledge will be opened by e-knowledge marketplaces;
    • Creation and use of knowledge will be combined in many settings (e.g. communities of practices) resulting in a sort of barter and free access for insiders; and
    • New patterns of interactivity will enable dramatic reductions in the cost and price of cohort-based learning experiences.
  • e-Knowledge enables disruptive offerings from new competitors. Lower-cost learning practices are developed in emerging markets in Asia and in Central and South America. Lower-cost models are selectively applied in markets in North America and Europe, further driving down prices for content and learning.
  • Relationships with learners, customers, members, and other stakeholders can be leveraged to create new, personalized combinations of products, services, and experiences.
   
 
  • e-knowledge and ambient interactivity will enable the participation of expert practitioners in tradecraft-rich learning; and
  • autonomic learning within communities of practice will create perpetual, sustainable patterns of interactivity around knowledge sharing and learning.

These changes in interactivity will expand the range of choices available to learners and knowledge seekers. Premium, high-cost options will be available, as they always have been. But lower-cost, reinvented options will prove more attractive to many individuals and enterprises.

 

Changes in the Economics of Knowledge Sharing and Learning. e-Knowledge will change the economics of knowledge sharing and learning in several ways:

  • sources, types, and combinations of digital knowledge assets will increase exponentially, enabling greater choice and personalization;
  • unit costs of producing individual units of digital assets will decline as enterprises refine routines, policies, protocols, use of auto-tagging tools and agents, and explore alternate sources of e-knowledge;
         
         

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