A revolution in the sharing of knowledge…

Transforming e-Knowledge  
TABLE OF CONTENTS     Paths to the e-Knowledge Future
© SCUP 2003
   
back page   Page 58   next page    

The e-Knowledge Imperative (continued)

   

Chapter 3

Paths to the
e-Knowledge Future

book image
Book Purchase

Home
Index
Case Studies
Glossary
Bibliography
Contact us

   

The Changing Role of Learning in the Knowledge Economy

     
Traditional Learning   Learning in the Knowledge and Service Economy

Learning’s Value Proposition and Organizational Context. Learning builds long-term human capital (education) for eventual use or is targeted at specific skills gaps (training).

 

Learning’s Value Proposition and Organizational Context. Some learning develops human capital or specific skills. Most learning yields immediate value, solves problems, and builds tangible competitive advantage.

The Driving Forces for Learning. Learning is driven by long-term human development needs or by the necessity to fill specific knowledge gaps.

 

The Driving Forces for Learning. Learning is driven directly by ongoing changes in the business environment, which are immediately translated into changes in organizational strategy, programs, competencies, and processes. These changes are immediately reflected in tailored learning programs and personalized interventions.

Infrastructures for Learning. Separate learning silos exist in different parts of the organization. Some integration of learning infrastructure occurs across the enterprise.

 

Infrastructures for Learning. Infrastructures for learning and knowledge management are fully integrated. No silos; same infrastructure serves for the entire enterprise.

Patterns and Cadences of Learning. Intermittent learning, formal courses, and classes. A delivery metaphor characterizes learning.

 

Patterns and Cadences of Learning. Perpetual learning that can be engaged in wherever learners might be. Some formal courses and classes remain, complemented by highly granular learning experiences and modules. Interactivity replaces delivery as the driving metaphor.

Relation of Learning to Other Activities. Learning is a distinct activity. One takes time out for learning.

 

Relation of Learning to Other Activities. Learning is fused with work and many other activities. Just-in-time learning becomes pervasive.

Customization and Personalization. Learning experiences are seldom customized or personalized. When they are, the process is time-consuming, expensive, and limited by technology systems and organizational competencies.

 

Customization and Personalization. By design, every learning activity is rapidly and seamlessly customized to emerging needs. Learning is personalized to fit the learning preferences and requirements of individuals. Much learning is autonomic, engaged in by communities of practice to meet emergent needs.

Response Time for Learning Design and Delivery. Learning is based on off-the-shelf curriculum or time-consuming tailoring to meet emerging needs.

 

Response Time for Learning Design and Delivery. Environmental changes are rapidly translated into changing organizational requirements, strategies and tailored learning.

Balance Between Structured and Autonomic Learning. Learning is primarily structured or self-paced. Autonomic learning by the individual and community of practice is impossible with traditional knowledge tools.

 

Balance Between Structured and Autonomic Learning. Both are essential. e-Knowledge enables the explosion of community practice-based, autonomic learning.

 

back page   Page 58   next page

|  TOP  |